MEC 2007 Election Results

Cooperrider SLATE takes 5 of 7 seats 
Scalmanini and O'Brien survive


Denny O'Brien as the ballots are counted

By King Collins

There were (about) 80 ballots actually received of (about) 200 mailed. A 40% turnout. The following figures are exact.

  1. Sid Cooperrider 58
  2. Dave Smith 54
  3. Teri Nieves 53
  4. Steve Scalmanini 51
  5. Denny O'Brien 47
  6. Jenny Shakman 46
  7. Bill Thornsby 43

The above 7 are the members of the new board. 

Congratulations to all of you.

Here's the rest of the ballot count: Jessica Clark 37, Callie Ashe 30, Maca McClure 30, Verge Belanger 23, King Collins 22. Clark Ramm 19

Further comment: 

The SLATE set out to eliminate the possibility of certain individuals  being elected and they succeeded in that. To do so, the Cooperrider SLATE was willing to sacrifice Scalmanini and O'Brien who disagreed with the slate tactic. Fortunately these two survived. 

In my opinion, Denny O'Brien is particularly deserving of a seat on the board. He has already passed around a plan for board action. In that document he states that the MEC directors should operate as a doer board rather than just a policy/money board. 

The MEC board should be composed of doers who are each involved with, and responsible for, an area of activity. These areas should include, at the minimum: office management; fiscal matters; KMEC radio; the MEC newsletter/website/list-serve; events/outreach; and governance/grievance. These doer-directors would report at each board meeting while ensuring that the activities comply with state and federal law and the Center’s own bylaws and policies.

If the board accepts Denny's leadership, then I think it will do very well for the MEC. 

King Collins
king@greenmac.com

Here's Denny O'Brien's piece:

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Proper and Effective Governance

By Denny O'Brien

A few folks have asked what I meant by “proper and effective governance” in my candidates statement.

Some have suggested that the Mendocino Environmental Center should operate under the same model as the Ukiah Co-op. There, a constant cash flow and the need for a paid staff result in a board that pays attention to policy but does not itself perform the day-to-day functions of operating a grocery co-operative.

That model does not work for the MEC and its activities. We have no paid staff; all cash is dedicated to maintaining the facility, to facilitating the activities of dedicated advocates. The MEC board should be composed of doers who are each involved with, and responsible for, an area of activity. These areas should include, at the minimum: office management; fiscal matters; KMEC radio; the MEC newsletter/website/list-serve; events/outreach; and governance/grievance. These doer-directors would report at each board meeting while ensuring that the activities comply with state and federal law and the Center’s own bylaws and policies.

I would personally offer to head up the governance and grievance committee. My experience suggests that, when things go wrong, the problem is often systemic rather than personal. As a trained mediator and facilitator I would help manage and avoid the kind of blowups that have bedeviled the organization, used up too much of its time and energy, and distracted it from its mission.

That mission, or at least part of it, is to facilitate the work of dedicated advocates. The one common thread among everyone I have met at the Center is the compelling need to do something worthwhile. Good governance must provide a way to focus and facilitate such energy and good will. Only then will people reach their full potential, and the Mendocino Environmental Center will become the shining light that is its best destiny.

Respond to Denny O'Brien


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king@greenmac.com
 http://www.greenmac.com